Nearest station

Senjuōhashi

Keisei Line

Tōkyō-to, Adachi-ku, Senjū-Hashido-chō 25

東京都足立区千住橋戸町25

橋戸稲荷神社

   Hashido Inari Jinja

Home page: None

August 30, 2017

Enshrined Deities:  

Main

Ukanomitama-mikoto  倉稲魂命

From Merged Shrines

In-ground Shrines: 

Inari Jinja  稲荷神社

Earliest mention of:   926

Annual Festival:    Nearest Sunday to September 14

Overview

In the  roughly eight square kilometre area between the Arakawa and Sumida rivers defined by the Shinarakawa Bridge to the east and the Nishiarai Bridge to the west there are at least 13 shrines. I plan to look at some of them, starting with this one, the Hashido Inari Jinja, and then the Naka-chō Hikawa Jinja.

  

History

Two foundation dates five centuries apart are given for this shrine, 926 and 1490. The earlier date refers to the construction of a small shrine on a low mound near to a ferry crossing point on the Arakawa (now Sumida) River to service the devotional needs of local settlers and cargo boats plying their trade between the upper Arakawa River and the then fledgling Edo.

1490 seems to have been when Ukanomitama-mikoto was enshrined and a main hall was built. In 1594 the Senjuōhashi (lit. Large Senju Bridge) was built across the Arakawa and in 1597 Senju was officially designated  a post station (jushuku), the first from Nihonbashi, on both the  Ōshū and Nikkō Highways (kaidō).  Almost four centuries later, in 1862, the prayer hall was built.  

Description

 The current main hall, built like a storehouse with walls covered in mud, is both somewhat unusual and the shrine's main claim to relative fame. On the back of its two front doors are engravings of two kitsune in the kote-e style by Irie Chōhachi. The doors are only opened to public view three times a year, on February 3, May 15 and one other occasion. The photos in the fourth rank below are of replicas added to either side of the hengaku in the prayer hall in 1988. 

(Click on images to expand them)

橋戸稲荷神社    Hashido Inari Jinja
kitsune in the kote-e style by Irie Chōhachi
kitsune in the kote-e style by Irie Chōhachi
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon

© Rod Lucas 2016-2019

All text and photos by Lucas unless otherwise stated