Nearest station

Teradachō Station

 JR Osaka Loop Line 

Ōsaka-fu, Ōsaka-shi, Tennōji-ku, Daidō 3-7-3 

大阪府大阪市天王寺区大道3-7−3 

河堀稲生神社

   Kobore Inari Jinja

26 July, 2020

homepage (none)

This is the tenth of the ex post facto shrine reports I compiled while under continuing self-imposed isolation after the   Covid-19 State of Emergency in Tōkyō was lifted.

History

Like Ōe Jinja, Kobori Inari Jinja is one of the The Seven Shitennoji Miya. The precursor of this shrine may date to the reign of the semi-legendary 12th Emperor, Keiko (reigned 71–130).  It is thought to have been founded in a place then called Hirugaoka with Inari as the enshrined kami. When Shōtoku Taishi had  Shitennoji Temple built in 593 a main hall was built at the shrine and Emperor Sushun ( 崇峻天皇, 520-592) was jointly enshrined. 
According to the Shoku Nihongi, a high-ranking government official in Settsu Province, Wake no Kiyomaro (和気清麻呂) started large scale riparian works on the

Enshrined Kami:  

Main

(Note: numbers in parentheses after kami names

refer to position in How Many Kami table)

Uka-no-mitama-kami (75)  宇迦之御魂神

Emperor Sushun                     崇峻天皇

Susano-o-no mikoto (57)   素盞嗚尊

 

From Merged Shrines

None

In-ground Shrines:

Wakamiya Hachiman-Gū  若宮八幡宮

Ōjū Jinja                               櫻樹神社

Sorei-Sha                             祖霊社

 

​Annual Festival:    

Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社

land border between Settsu Province and Kawachi Province in March 788. The purpose was to develop new agricultural land and ward off water damage. Part of the process involved praying for success at the shrine. Along with this, the name of the area was changed from Kobore (古保礼) to Kawahara. Nine centuries later, a donation from Katagiri Katsumoto (片桐且元, 1556-1615,) enabled the construction of a splendid new prayer hall linked to the main hall by a connecting passageway. The Katagiri clan served the Minamoto Clan, and Katsumoto himself is probably best remembered as being one of the Seven Spears of Shizugatake, a group of samurai who served as personal bodyguards to Toyotomi Hideyoshi in the Battle of Shizugatake in 1583. Slightly over a century later, in 1689, Susanono Mitoko (素盞鳴尊) the enfant terrible of the Japanese pantheon, was jointly enshrined. In 1907 Shimizudani Inari Jinja, which is thought to have been the tutelary shrine inside Ōsaka Castle, was merged into the shrine and the current name of Kobore Inari Jinja was adopted. The prayer hall, which had existed since the sixteenth century, was destroyed during the US bombing raids of 1945. Reconstruction was completed in 1950. 

(Click on images to expand them)

Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社
Kobore Inari Jinja  河堀稲生神社

© Rod Lucas 2016-2020

All text and photos by Lucas unless otherwise stated