Nearest station

Shinmaruko

  Tōkyū Tōyoko Line

Kanagawa-ken, Kawasaki-shi, Nakahara-ku, Kamimaruko, Sanno-chō 1-1555

神奈川県川崎市中原区上丸子山王町1-1555

日枝神社

  Hie Jinja

Home page: (Japanese) none

August 24, 2018

History

It is said that this Hie Jinja was founded on June 14, 809 during the reign of the 50th Emperor, Kanmu, by the second son of one of the emperor’s legitimate children, Prince Tsunesada (貞恒親王), Yamamoto Heisaemon (山本平左衛門尉) who, together with his younger brother Jirōsaemon (二郎左衛門), built a shrine in a place then called Inageshō Kawasaki-mura (稲毛庄河崎村). The shrine was known as Sannō Gongen, reflecting the name of the enshrined deity

who was adopted through the bunrei process from Hiyoshi Taisha in Otsu Province, the main shrine (sōhongū) of the near 5,000 strong Hiyoshi/Hie/Sannō shrine grouping.   Shortly afterwards, in 809, the shrine was moved further to the west, to Maruko, its current location, in response to a divine intimation.

 

 

Enshrined Kami:  

Main

(Note: numbers in parentheses after kami names

refer to position in How Many Kami table)

Ōnamuchi-kami                             大己貴神

 

From Merged Shrines

Ketsumiko-kami                               家都御子神

Tateminakata-no-mikoto (111)    建御名方命

Ōjin-tennō                                        応神天王

Amaterasu Ōkami (55)                   天照大

Sugawara no Michizane                 菅原道真

Yamato Takeru-no-Mikoto 186E   日本武尊

In-ground Shrines:

Inari Jinja          稲荷神社 

Ōwashi Jinja     大鷲神社

 

​Annual Festival:    September 14, 15

Over two centuries later, in May 1178, the then Minister of the Interior, Taira Shigemori, sent a senior retainer to Kantō; this resulted in the rebuilding of the shrine, and along with this a treasured 9寸5分の剱 sword was dedicated. With the advent of the Tokugawa regime more substantive help was forthcoming in the form of a 25 koku trading license, which was awarded on August 17, 1642 during the reign of the third Tokugawa, Iemitsu.

A further 227 years later, 1869 to be precise, the name of the shrine was changed to Hie Jinja, and in 1918, seven local shrines—Hachiman, Tenman, Dairokuten, Kumano, Shinmei, Suwa, Sugiyama—were merged into it. In 1928 the Hall of Offerings and the Prayer Hall were rebuilt after being destroyed during the Great Kantō Earthquake of 1923.

Description

About 650m from Shinmaruko Station and close to the Tamagawa River. There are many items of interest scattered around the shrine grounds. Among these are the Sarugami (猿神, lit. “monkey god), shown in these photos. These are part of the Sannō Shintō tradition—remember the original name of Hie Jinja was Sannō Gongen—and are seen as messengers from Hiyoshi Taisha to other Hiyoshi/Hie jinja around the country. The in-ground shrines also have their own picturesque, if kitsune-heavy appeal. This shrine is well worth a visit, particularly in combination with one to Keihin Fushimi Inari Jinja, about 600m away in the general direction of Shinmaruko Station.

(Click on images to expand them)

Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
 
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
Hie Jinja Kanagawa Kawasaki, 日枝神社 神奈川 川崎
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© Rod Lucas 2016-2019

All text and photos by Lucas unless otherwise stated