Nearest station

Nishikoyama

Tōkyū Meguro Line

Tōkyō-to, Shinagawa-ku, Ebara 7-5-14

東京都品川区荏原 7-5-14

小山八幡神社 

Koyama Hachiman Jinja

Home page: None

March 4, 2017

History

This is one of at least six Hachiman Jinja in Shinagawa-ku. Legend has it that worship began on this site in the 3rd year of the Chōgen Period (1030) when Minamoto Yorinobu consecrated Hondawake-no-mikoto as the local deity. Later, Myōken Bosatsu came to be worshipped alongside Hondawake and the shrine was known either as Myōken Hachiman or, reflecting the old name for what is now Koyama, Ikenotani Hachiman. Note that Hondawake (sometimes Homudawake) is the given name of Emperor Ōjin, the main kami of the Hachiman sect. Following a religious dispute around the turn of the 18th Century the shrine was split in two, with the resulting new shrine taking the name of  Sanya Hachiman Jinja, under which name it still exists less than a kilometer to the north of Koyama Hachiman. The enforcement of the March 1868 Shinbutsu Hanzenrei (lit. Distinction between Shintō and Buddhism Order) resulted in the Myōken Bosatsu deity being relocated to the nearby Mayaji Temple

Description

About 500 metres away from Nishikoyama Station, the shrine is said to be located on top of an old burial mound, "koyama" literally means small mountain. it is one of the Ebara Shichi 

Enshrined Deities:  

Main

誉田別命  Hondawake-no-mikoto

In-ground Shrines: 

大黒神社   Daikokuten Sha

稲荷社      Inari Sha

Earliest mention of:   ??    

Annual Festival:  Nearest Saturday & Sunday

                              to September 6 and 7

Fukujin (Ebara Seven Lucky Gods) locations, and the particular kami it enshrines is Daikokuten. While It may be an exaggeration to say that the parishioners of the Koyama and Sanya Hachiman Jinja tend to treat them as one shrine, it is nevertheless the case that the annual festival in September is celebrated jointly by the two shrines. A total of seven mikoshi (palinquin/portable shrine) are assembled in front of Musashikoyama Station, Sanya Hachiman's "home" station, from where the procession wends its way to Nishikoyama. 

 
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon

© Rod Lucas 2016-2019

All text and photos by Lucas unless otherwise stated