Nearest station

Ōtorii

 Keikyu Airport Line

Tōkyō-to, Ōta-ku,  Honhaneda  3-9-12

東京都大田区本羽田3-9-12

羽田神社

  Haneda Jinja

February 16, 2018

Enshrined Kami:  

Main

(Note: numbers in parentheses after kami names

refer to position in How Many Kami table)

Susano-o-no mikoto (57)      素盞嗚尊

Kushinada-hime-mikoto (70)        奇稲田姫命

 

From Merged Shrines

None

In-ground Shrines:

Fuji Sangen Jinja                       富士浅間神社

Suzuna Inari Jinja                     鈴納稲荷神社

Masuda Inari Jinja                    増田稲荷神社

Hiei Jinja                                     日枝神社

Haneda Inari Jinja                    羽田稲荷神社

 

Earliest mention of:   

Annual Festival:  First & second Saturday of July 

History

Haneda Jinja: It seems that about 800 years ago during the Kamakura Period the commander of the naval forces off the Haneda shore, Namekata Yojirō, worshipped at a Jinja where Gozu-Tennō was enshrined. This shrine was the predecessor of what is now Haneda Jinja, and even today the latter is often informally referred to as Gozu-Tennō. In pre-Meiji times members of leading samurai families, including Tokugawa, Shimazu, and Todō, often visited the shrine.

According to a stone monument in the shrine grounds the man who would later become the 13th Tokugawa Shōgun, Iesada, visited the shrine in 1858 to pray for a recovery from the smallpox he was infected with. The prayers were successful, he recovered, and in 1861 when a smallpox epidemic struck the region there was a surge of visitors to the shrine anxious to gain immunity. Protection against illness is one the divine powers attributed to Gozu-Tennō

Until 1869, the Gozu-Tennō shrine was in the grounds of the Jishō-in temple, but along with the enactment of the Shin-butsu Bunri (Separation of Shintō and Buddhism) Order in that year the shrine was separated from the temple and was set up independently as Yagumo Jinja; in 1907 it was renamed Haneda Jinja.  The main hall was rebuilt in 1988.

​Description

For me the most interesting aspect of Haneda Jinja is its Fujizuka. Neither particularly large or particularly old--it is 3 metres high, Shinagawa Fuji is 15 metres, it was built in 1868, the oldest ones date back to the late eighteenth century--it was designated a tangible folk cultural asset by Ōta-ku in 1974. It is made of lava, and each July 1 it had been open to the public but owing to fear of damage entry is now forbidden.

Also interesting are the large lanterns flanking the first torii, these were dedicated in 1887 but have since been repaired, and the pair of koma-inu in front of the second torii, these date to 1819. The temizuya is also worth a mention. Normally the  water used in purification comes out of the mouth of what is usually described as a dragon; in Haneda Jinja's case this function is performed by a bull, i.e. Gozu-Tennō, and this should not be confused with the "nade-ushi" (撫で牛) seen in Tenman-gu or Jinja

(Click on images to expand them)

Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
Haneda Jinja	羽田神社
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© Rod Lucas 2016-2019

All text and photos by Lucas unless otherwise stated