Nearest station

Shiojiri

   JR Chūo Line

Nagano-ken, Shiojiri-shi, Daimon 358

長野県塩尻市大門三番町358

 

大門神社

   Daimon Jinja

Home page: none

July 23, 2018

Enshrined Kami:  

Main

(Note: numbers in parentheses after kami names

refer to position in How Many Kami table)

Homuda-wake-no-mikoto             品陀和氣命

Ōhosazaki-no-mikoto          大鷦鷯尊

 

From Merged Shrines

None

In-ground Shrines:

Suiten-Gū         水天宮
Ōmine Jinja      大峰神社
Ebisu Jinja        蛭子神社
Kodama Jinja   蚕玉神社

Ōba Jinja          大姥神社

 

​Annual Festival:    

History

Located as it was amid productive farmland, indeed still is, and at the entry to Shiojiri Shuku (塩尻宿), the 30th of the 69 stations of the Nakasendō, Daimon flourished during the Edo Period. The shrine’s history board lists two other shrines at more or less the same address as its own, Wakamiya Hachiman-sha (若宮八幡社) and Shibamiya Hachiman Jinja (柴宮八幡社). The former’s origin is in a 918.5m mountain, Uenoyama (上野山), at the end of a ridge to the south of Shiojiri. At the foot of the mountain near to a lake, Ubagaike (姥池), there is a fresh water spring, so fresh in fact that the Wakamiya Hachiman-sha was set up there to honour the Water Kami, and the spring is still flowing.  Shibamiya Hachiman Jinja dates to 1355 during the Nanboku-chō Period when the forces of the Southern Court set up a command post at a place called Kikyōgahara, and along

Daimon Jinja  大門神社
Daimon Jinja  大門神社

with it the shrine. In 1873 both shrines were given Village Shrine (sonsha) ranking and designated as Shinsen-heihakuryō-kyōshin-jinja. In 1952 Wakamiya was absorbed by Shibamiya and the new entity was named Daimon Jinja.  In April 1954 the new shrine was registered with the Association of Shintō Shrines and in July of the same year was recognized as a religious corporation by the Prefectural Government. In 1975 the Prayer Hall, Offerings Hall and Shrine Office were rebuilt.

Description

About 1.2km from Shiojiri Station, there is a bus service. Note that of the two enshrined deities Ōhosazaki-no-mikoto is an alternative name for the 16th emperor, Nintoku. Interestingly, the jinjajin.jp page (Japanese) on Daimon Jinja only lists  four in-ground shrines for it, while this photo clearly shows five. The missing one is Ōba Jinja, and its presence here is presumably related to the Ubagaike lake mentioned here.

(Click on images to expand them)

Daimon Jinja  大門神社
Daimon Jinja  大門神社
Daimon Jinja  大門神社
Daimon Jinja  大門神社
Daimon Jinja  大門神社
Daimon Jinja  大門神社
Daimon Jinja  大門神社
Daimon Jinja  大門神社
Daimon Jinja  大門神社
Daimon Jinja  大門神社

Suiten-Gū

Suiten-Gū         水天宮
Suiten-Gū         水天宮

Ebisu Jinja

Ebisu Jinja        蛭子神社
Ebisu Jinja        蛭子神社

Ōmine Jinja

Ōmine Jinja      大峰神社
Ōmine Jinja      大峰神社

Ōba Jinja

Ōba Jinja          大姥神社
Ōba Jinja          大姥神社

Kodama Jinja

Kodama Jinja   蚕玉神社
Kodama Jinja   蚕玉神社
 
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© Rod Lucas 2016-2019

All text and photos by Lucas unless otherwise stated